Sample Lessons

Time: Rhythms, Beats, and Measures

Since we already talked about pitch and reading notes, this lesson will cover note values and time. I'll explain the meaning of the beat, measures, and bar lines. Together, we'll count out the values of whole, half, and quarter notes. The two numbers at the beginning of each song, called the time signature, will no longer be a mystery. When we fini ...

Applying Techniques to Solos I

This lesson is meant to help you put it all together with the lead guitar techniques we've learned so far. These include vibrato, hammer-ons, pull-offs, slides, and bends, within the A minor pentatonic scale.

If you took the previous lessons, then you've already had a glimpse of what were about to do. Maybe you've even begun to integrate the ...

Hendrix Fills II

We all know that Hendrix was the man! He just made it sound 'so cool' and has been imitated by so many. We even have a specific lesson area devoted just to him. That's pretty heavy.

In this lesson, we will be looking at some of his smoother ideas regarding chords, and we'll look at how to make them sound cooler than they are. (He always had ...

Legato 1: Preparing the Technique

Legato 1: Preparing the Technique Joe Satriani

Construction of Major Scale

For this lesson, we are going to take a look at the construction of the major scale. We will discover how to construct a major scale by knowing the formula for a major scale. We will see how by plugging in this formula, we are able to play a C Major scale by moving up the neck of the guitar on one string. Understanding scale construction is a very ...

Swing Comping Patterns

Accompanying others in a jazz setting is very different from accompanying in other musical styles. In rock, blues and pop music, the guitarist is expected to lay down a steady rhythm. While there are times in jazz when this is also true, the guitar's role is generally to complement whatever the soloist is doing. In this lesson, we will discuss vari ...

Musical Background 1

Musical Background 1 George Benson

Introducing Two-Note Chords (I-IV-V in A)

Good day blues guitar enthusiasts and thanks for joining me. Today we're going to discuss some very simple chords that will get you on the way to playing like Muddy Waters in a flash! They can all be played with one finger and each of them uses an open string as it's root. The three chords we are going to discuss in particular will enable you play ...

12-Bar Blues in C Minor (6th-String Root)

In this lesson, we are going to explore a minor blues classic. Many sad and lamenting songs have been built on these changes. It's rumored that B.B. King purchased a small island in the Caribbean with the money he made from these chord changes. We will also be doing some soloing and learning how to negotiate a tricky chord change. So, if you're re ...

A7 Root-6 Arpeggio

In jazzy blues, arpeggios play a vital role in improvisation. Arpeggios are simply the notes of a chord played one note at a time. The standard walking blues bass line is an arpeggio. In this lesson we will explore the A7 arpeggio and how to make it sound bluesy and cool! Youve heard these licks before in the intro to Louis Jordans 'Caledonia' and ...

Chord Switching Tips and Review

Before we move ahead with your acoustic guitar lessons, I'd like to do a quick review of some basic open chords. In this lesson, we'll take a look at A, A7 and Amin, C, D and D7, E, E7 and Emin, G and G7. We'll also go over the concept of rhythm and strumming. I'll give you some great tips that can help speed up your chord changing and make them so ...

Triad Arpeggio Bass Lines

This is going to be a lesson involving playing bass lines in a boogie style using the chord tones of the chords being played. The rhythms are often shuffle-type grooves and the lines are sometimes augmented by occasional chord hits. To play our bass lines, we draw from the chord tones of the chord being played, sometimes just the root, 3rd and 5th, ...

5/4 and 7/4

In this next lesson, we're going to discuss odd time signatures.

A time signature is considered odd, or asymmetric, when it has any number of beats other than 3 or 4 beats per measure, or any other number of beats per measure that is not a dividend of 3 or 4. I'm going to show you how to count odd tempo measures and how to break up the meas ...

Arpeggios 1

Arpeggios 1 Joe Satriani